Weather Icon
71°F
Cloudy
Ed Eilert for Johnson County Commision Chair Boulevard Limousine in Kansas City and Gardner, KS Great Life De Soto Fitness Center in De Soto, KS Tim Miller American Family Insurance Gardner, Kansas Night on the Kaw in De Soto, KS
LIke the Gardner EDGE on Facebook

K-State Grain Science Professor Named First Wilbur Endowed Professor in Stored-Product Protection

Posted on Dec. 19th, 2011
by Nancy Peterson
K-State Research & Extension N
Dr. Bhadriraju Subramanyam
MANHATTAN, Kan. - Kansas State University professor of grain science, Subramanyam "Subi" Bhadriraju, has been appointed the first Donald A. Wilbur Endowed Professor in Stored-Product Protection at K-State.

Bhadriraju will begin the three-year appointment on Jan. 1, 2012.

He joined the K-State faculty as an associate professor in 1996 and was named full professor in 2003. Prior to 1993, he was on faculty at the University of Minnesota.

Bhadriraju is recognized internationally for his expertise in managing insects in grain and grain products throughout the supply chain. His research focuses on alternatives to pesticides for managing stored-product insects, such as the use of reduced-risk products in stored grains and use of elevated temperatures for managing insects in food-processing facilities, among others. Additional information about his projects can be viewed at http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/grsc_subi.

The endowed professorship was created by Don and Eunice Wilbur of Paola, Kan., to honor Donald A. Wilbur, former professor in K-State's Department of Entomology, and to provide financial assistance to an outstanding faculty member in stored-product protection in K-State's College of Agriculture (related article: http://www.found.ksu.edu/wp/?p=557).

Eunice Wilbur is from Sabetha, Kan. and graduated from K-State in 1959 with a bachelor's degree in elementary education. Don, a Manhattan, Kan. native, attended K-State from 1954 to 1959, and is the founder of the Industrial Fumigant Company (IFC), Olathe, Kan., a pest management service provider for the grain and food industry.

Don's father, Donald A. Wilbur, was a faculty member in K-State's Department of Entomology for 43 years. He retired in 1970, but continued working on several research projects until 1975.

Prof. Wilbur recognized that commercial grain handlers and farmers died every year because of improper use of pesticides used in grain storage. He started a safety program focused on the proper use of pesticides and safe grain handling procedures in Kansas. The program was so successful, it was adopted nationwide. While at K-State, Wilbur also developed a special course on "Milling Entomology" for milling students, to help them recognize and control insects in flour mills.

"We really appreciate the support of Don and Eunice and are happy to join them in honoring Don's father, who was a dedicated member of our faculty and mentor to his students," said Gary Pierzynski, interim dean of the College of Agriculture. "Dr. Bhadriraju's work in the field of stored product protection makes him a fitting recipient of this endowed professorship."

"Prof. Wilbur has done pioneering and classical research in stored-product protection, and it is indeed an honor to be recognized as a Don Wilbur Professor in Stored-Product Protection," Bhadriraju said. "I have known Don and Eunice for close to two decades and want to thank them for their generous support to K-State. Like his father, Don has contributed a lot to stored-product protection through his company to bring awareness of pesticides, interpreting label information, and developing educational programs to promote integrated pest management practices while protecting people and the environment. The company he started, IFC, still espouses these core principles.

Bhadriraju plans to use the annual $10,000 support associated with the professorship to encourage and recruit undergraduate students at K-State to conduct research in the area of stored-product protection.

"In the last three decades I have seen a decrease in the number of stored-product protection specialists in the United States. Unless we encourage young minds, we may not meet the future educational and research needs in this important area, that is not only a national need but an international need," Bhadriraju said.

More information about K-State's Department of Grain Science and Industry is available at http://www.grains.ksu.edu/p.aspx and Department of Entomology information is at http://www.entomology.ksu.edu/p.aspx.

 


K-State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well-being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K-State campus, Manhattan.