News From the Kansas Legislature – Week 7

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Rep. Bill Sutton

TURNAROUND WEEK

This week is called “Turnaround.” All the bills worked in any of the House committees have to be debated and voted this week on the floor of the House so they can move on to the Senate. Likewise, all the Senate bills come over to the House.

In all, we debated 68 bills this week. Some are very simple, technical in nature, and take very little time. Some are not and may be debated for two or three hours. Remember, each of these bills have also had hearings and debate in committee before ever making it to the floor.

The process is long and slow, but effective. If you’re still reading when you get to the “Floor Action” section, note how many of these bills passed unanimously or very close to it.

FIRST BILL SIGNED INTO LAW, 2018

On Wednesday, Governor Jeff Colyer signed SB 262, which authorizes the construction of a statue honoring President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The bill signing took place in Abilene, Kansas, the hometown and resting place of President Eisenhower. Later this year, this statue will be permanently displayed in the northwestern quadrant of the Capitol grounds. The statue itself is a replica of the statue displayed in the U.S. Capitol rotunda. SB 262 unanimously passed both chambers this legislative session, with a House vote of 123-0 and a Senate vote of 39-0.

TELEMEDICINE BILL ADVANCES TO THE SENATE

The House considered HB 2674 on Thursday, which would create the Kansas Telemedicine Act, in effort to establish coverage parity between in-person and telemedicine-delivered healthcare. Under the provisions of the bill, telemedicine must meet the same standard of care as an in-person interaction and would increase access to healthcare services for patients in both rural and urban areas.

Not only would patients have increased access to services that aren’t readily available to them in their community, but also affords them greater convenient access, which may reduce long term health care costs associated with treatment due to a lack of services. In addition, HB 2674 provides coverage parity because the healthcare services provided could not be denied for reimbursement solely on the basis of having been delivered via telemedicine or based on the lack of a physical location.

Physicians, physician assistants, advanced practice registered nurses, and licenses mental health professionals alike would be able to dispense their services via telemedicine to patients in a more convenient manner, thereby improving the health and lifestyle of many who have difficulty accessing immediate healthcare. The bill would also prohibit any authorization of delivery of any abortion procedure via telemedicine.

SWATTING, BODY CAMERAS, COMPENSATION FOR THE WRONGFULLY CONVICTED

This week, the House passed three corrections-related bills that present commonsense solutions, including harsher penalties for those who make false 911 calls, require the release of law enforcement body camera footage to those who are involved, and to provide monetary compensation to individuals who have been wrongfully convicted and imprisoned.

HB 2581, also known as the “swatting” bill, was originally drafted in response to the rising frequency of false 911 calls resulting in the unnecessary deployment of swat and law enforcement, but more specifically due to the death last year in Wichita. A California resident named Tyler Barriss disguised his phone number and called the authorities of Wichita, and claimed he was armed and dangerous, and resided in a Wichita household.

Swat members were deployed under such impressions, and a resident named Andrew T. Finch was killed at the scene. This bill would significantly increase the criminal penalties for individuals who make these prank calls. Should such calls result in a fatality, the sentencing level would be a severity level 1, person felony, the harshest penalty on record in Kansas. This bill was passed by the House unanimously and may now be considered by the Senate.

Additionally, the House passed HB 2571 which would require a law enforcement agency to allow designated individuals to hear or view any audio or video recording made by a body or vehicle camera within twenty days of receiving a request for information. Such designated individuals include the subjects of the recording, a parent or legal guardian of a minor who is involved, a legal heir to those involved, or an attorney representing any of these individuals mentioned.

This bill also passed the House unanimously and may now be considered by the Senate. Lastly, HB 2579 entitles individuals who have been wrongfully convicted and imprisoned to receive $80,000 for each year of imprisonment, as well as $25,000 for each additional year served on parole or post-release supervision. Claimants would be entitled to receive reasonable attorney fees and costs incurred as well, and such wrongfully convicted crimes would be expunged from their records. HB 2579 passed the House 116-1 and may now be considered by the Senate.

LEAVENWORTH COUNTY REPUBLICAN LINCOLN DAY DINNER

Friday night, I had the opportunity to attend this dinner for the first time. Wow! Excellent crowd, many statewide office candidates and a phenomenal keynote speaker. If you haven’t heard Burgess Owens (photo below), since he retired from the NFL, you’re missing out.  We should really consider doing something like this in Johnson County.

FLOOR ACTION

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19
Final action votes from Thursday February 15:
HB 2435— Concerning emergency telephone services; relating to the Kansas 911 Act; audits by the Division of Legislative Post Audit
Final Action, February 19, 121-0
I voted “aye.”

HB 2488— Removing alcohol as special fuel under the motor-fuel tax law
Final Action, February 19, 121-0
I voted “aye.”

HB 2547— Establishing October 15 as the end of a State Fair Board member term
Final Action, February 19, 120-1
I voted “aye.”

HB 2556— Establishing the State Interoperability Advisory Committee
Final Action, February 19, 96-25
I voted “nay.”

SB 217— Updating certain statutory references relating to the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services

This bill updates several statutory references in accordance with 2016 SB 449. That bill updated statutes related to responsibilities transferred to KDADS under 2012 Executive Reorganization Order No. 41.
Final Action, February 20, 118-0
Bill carried by: Representative Randy Powell
I voted “aye.”

HB 2147— Providing an income tax refund for certain Native American veterans

The bill would allow certain Native American veterans who had state income taxes improperly withheld from their military income to apply for a refund plus interest. This bill was amended by Representative Osterman. His amendment struck the language regarding the interest paid, with the hope of addressing at a later time.
Final Action, February 20, 118-0
Bill carried by: Representative Shelee Brim
I voted “aye.”

HB 2465— Designating Kansas Commission on Veterans Affairs Office employees as safety sensitive positions subject to drug screening

All of the Office’s employees would be added to the safety-sensitive positions list, which subjects them to the state’s drug screening program. The fiscal note indicates that the cost of the drug screens would be absorbed within existing resources.
Final Action, February 20, 101-17
Bill carried by: Representative Diana Dierks
I voted “aye.”

HB 2486— Allowing golf carts to be driven on certain streets at night

This bill allows golf carts to be driven at night on certain streets provided they are equipped with lights required by law, at a minimum equal to motorcycle lighting. Existing law prohibits operation of golf carts on any interstate, federal, or state highway; on any public highway or street within a city unless authorized by that city; and on any street or highway with a posted speed limit exceeding 30 miles per hour.
Final Action, February 20, 89-29
Bill carried by: Representative Shannon Francis
I voted “aye.”

HB 2511— Making commercial driver’s licenses renewable every five years

This bill extends the period of time a commercial driver’s license is valid after initial issuance or renewal from four to five years.
Final Action, February 20, 118-0
Bill carried by: Representative Linda Gallagher
I voted “aye.”

HB 2558— Relating to the annual expiration date of controlled shooting area licenses
This bill was placed on the Consent Calendar by the Agriculture Committee
Final Action, February 19, 121-0
I voted “aye.”

HB 2608— Authorizing the Secretary of Corrections to convey property to fire district 1 of Leavenworth county by quit claim deed.

This bill was placed on the Consent Calendar by the Corrections and Juvenile Justice Committee
Final Action, February 19, 121-0
I voted “aye.”

HB 2628— Concerning airport authorities

This bill would allow the City of Pratt to dissolve, via adoption of an appropriate ordinance, any airport authority(authority) created and established by the City. If such an airport authority is dissolved, the City would acquire the property of the authority subject to any leases or agreements made by the authority.
Final Action, February 20, 118-0
Bill carried by: Representative Greg Lewis
I voted “aye.”

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20
HB 2088— Allowing use of certified drug abuse treatment program for drug severity level 4 crimes

This expands the Certified Drug Abuse Treatment Program to offenders with drug severity level 4 crimes. This bill has the potential to reduce bed space in prisons, with offenders being offered the option of drug treatment.
Final Action, February 21, 121-0
Bill carried by: Representative Steven Becker
I voted “aye.”

HB 2361— Transferring administration of the state workers compensation self-insurance fund to the Department of Administration

This bill originated from a recommendation from the Alvarez and Marsal efficiency study. Amendments brought by Rep. Curtis and Rep. Hodge were defeated.
Final Action, February 21, 119-3
Bill carried by: Representative Cindy Neighbor
I voted “aye.”

HB 2448— Providing membership in the KP&F retirement system for security officers of the Department of Corrections

The bill was introduced by Representative Jennings. The bill allows the Department of Corrections to become an eligible employer in the KP&F retirement system, beginning on January 1, 2019.
Final Action, February 21, 113-9
Bill carried by: Representative Russ Jennings
I voted “aye.”

HB 2454— Allowing a juvenile’s attorney to waive appearance at the 14-day detention review hearing

The bill also permits the use of audio-video technology for the purpose of conducting a juvenile detention review hearing in the district court
Final Action, February 21, 121-1
Bill carried by: Representative Susan Humphries
I voted “aye.”

HB 2479— Allowing criminal cases to be stayed during state appeal of writ of habeas corpus relief

The bill creates law in the Kansas Code of Criminal Procedure providing for an automatic stay in an underlying criminal case when a district court has granted relief in a KSA 60-1507 proceeding and the prosecution files an appellate docketing statement appealing from the District Court’s decision
Final Action, February 21, 122-0
Bill carried by: Representative John Wheeler
I voted “aye.”

HB 2498— Prohibiting governmental entities from prohibiting the wearing of tribal regalia and objects of cultural significance at public events

This bill was introduced by Representative Ponka-We Victors. The effective date of the act is upon publication in the Kansas Register.
Final Action, February 21, 122-0
Bill carried by: Representative Ponka-WeVictors
I voted “aye.”

HB 2501— Establishing the Health Occupations Credentialing Fee Fund

This bill takes fees collected for credentialing a number of occupations and deposits them into the Health Occupations Credentialing Fee Fund. Currently those fees go to the SGF.
Final Action, February 21, 122-0
Bill carried by: Representative Ron Ellis
I voted “aye.”

HB 2534— Defining exhibition of speed or acceleration offense

Representative Eric Smith offered a technical amendment to the bill, which was adopted.
Final Action, February 21, 82-40
Bill carried by: Representative Eric Smith
I voted “aye.”

HB 2539— Qualifications for candidates seeking certain statewide offices

Representative Carpenter (specific Attorney General requirements) and Representative Lusker (removing the 4-year residency requirement) were successful in amending the bill. Amendments by Representative Whitmer, Williams, and Miller failed.
Final Action, February 21, 94-28
Bill carried by: Representative Blake Carpenter
I voted “aye.”

HB 2542— Modifying certain fees and removing the fee sunset in the Kansas Postsecondary Educational Institution Act

In testimony, the Board of Regents indicated that removing the sunset would allow the Board to continue to charge fees sufficient to cover costs of regulating private and out-of-state postsecondary institutions.
Final Action, February 21, 108-14
Bill carried by: Representative Mark Schreiber
I voted “nay.”

HB 2551— Prohibiting the outsourcing or privatization of any operations or facilities of any correctional institution or juvenile correctional facility; allowing existing contracts to be renewed

The bill was introduced by Representatives Deere, Pittman, Ellis, Eplee, and Karleskint.
Final Action, February 21, 103-19
Bill carried by: Representative Debbie Deere
I voted “aye.”

HB 2597— Sedgwick County designated an urban area

The bill designates Sedgwick County as an urban area as permitted by Article 2, Section 17 of the Kansas Constitution. The designation would allow the Kansas Legislature to pass laws specific to those areas. Sedgwick County joins four other counties identified as urban areas: Shawnee, Wyandotte, Greeley, and Johnson County.
Final Action, February 21, 121-1
Bill carried by: Representative Jack Thimesch
I voted “aye.”

HB 2600– Increasing the fees assessed by KDHE for certain radiation protection services

The bill would establish a new category of fees for the Kansas radioactive materials
licensees who have multiple sites of use
Final Action, February 21, 106-16
Bill carried by: Representative Abraham Rafie
I voted “aye.”

HB 2729— Moving egg repackaging requirements from statute to rules and regulations adopted by the Secretary of the Kansas Department of Agriculture

This bill was placed on the Consent Calendar by the Agriculture Committee
Final Action, February 20, 118-0
I voted “aye.”

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21
HB 2040— Increasing the penalties for subsequent violations of traffic regulations prohibiting the improper passing of school buses

The bill increases the fine for improper passing of a school bus for any subsequent violation within five years to $750 for a second violation and to $1,000 for a third or subsequent violation. The fine in continuing law for improper passing of a school bus is $315.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Ron Highland
I voted “aye.”

HB 2419—State finances; transfers to and expenditures from the Budget Stabilization Fund

The bill was amended to take 50 percent of excess revenues to make payment toward the KPERS unfunded actuarial liability. During last session, an analyst from Pew Charitable Trusts testified in favor of the bill and indicated that using estimated receipts would decrease the volatility in the SGF.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Brad Ralph
I voted “aye.”

HB 2458— Adding violations of the act for obtaining a guardian or conservator, or both, to the crimes of mistreatment of a dependent adult and mistreatment of an elder person, changing the felony loss thresholds and adding the crimes to the inherently dangerous felonies list.

This bill would amend the crime of murder in the first degree to add mistreatment of dependent adult or an elder person to the list of inherently dangerous felonies that can underlie a charge of first degree murder. Both the mistreatment of a dependent adult and the mistreatment of an elder would also include knowingly inflicting physical injury, unreasonable confinement, or unreasonable punishment upon an elder person.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Steve Becker
I voted “aye.”

HB 2459— Amending the Kansas standard asset seizure and forfeiture act and establishing the Kansas asset seizure and forfeiture repository.

This bill would create a new section within the Kansas Standard Asset Seizure and Forfeiture Act (SASFA), which would require the Kansas Bureau of Investigation to establish the Kansas Asset and Forfeiture Repository. This repository would store information which would include the name of the seizing agency, the date, location, and time the seizure occurred, descriptions of the type of property and contraband seized and the estimated values of these belongings. Attorney fees, total cost of the forfeiture action, and the total proceeds from the forfeiture action would be posted. The information posted online must match the agency’s seizing report.
Final Action, February 22, 110-7
Bill carried by: Representative Fred Patton
I voted “aye.”

HB 2472— Relating to organ donation, amending the uniform anatomical gift act.

This bill would simplify the process to make organ donation wishes known on a Kansas driver’s license or ID. A driver’s license application would include a question which would give authorization to be listed as a specific organ donor in the Kansas Donor Registry. The driver’s license would have the word “Donor” placed on the front of the license.

Final Action, February 22, 117-0
I voted “aye.”

HB 2477— Relating to the Kansas pet animal act.

This bill would create new fee classifications for animal shelters or pounds due to a failed inspection. Additionally the bill would prohibit the Kansas Department of Agriculture from requiring a license of any individual who seeks to provide temporary care of dogs and cats.
Final Action, February 22, 103-14
Bill carried by: Representative Don Schroeder
I voted “nay.”

HB 2478—Relating to Kansas department of agriculture license renewal dates and late fees.

This bill would expand the Secretary of Agriculture’s ability to charge and collect late fees for any license, permits, or registration which are past due, capped at $100 or 40% of the current application fee.
Final Action, February 22, 102-15
Bill carried by: Representative Kent Thompson
I voted “nay.”

HB 2480— Changing the definition of “misdemeanor crime of domestic violence” in the Kansas law enforcement training act.

This bill would amend the definition of “misdemeanor crime of domestic violence” to replace a list of persons with various relationships to the victim, (e.g., current or former spouse), who commit a crime against an individual of whom they are involved in a “dating relationship” or is a “family or household member” at the time of offense.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Emil Bergquist
I voted “aye.”

HB 2481— Updating the Kansas adoption and relinquishment act.

This bill would amend technical definitions in the Kansas Adoption and Relinquishment Act.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Susan Humphries
I voted “aye.”

HB 2509— Election commissioners; role of the secretary of state and boards of county commissioners.

This bill would place the four county election commissioners under the budget authority of their respective county commissions (Johnson, Sedgwick, Shawnee, and Wyandotte). These four election commissioners would have no budgetary or personnel obligations to comply with the local county commissions, requests, standards or policies.
Final Action, February 22, 77-40
Bill carried by: Representative Kent Thompson
I voted “nay.”

HB 2523— Amending qualifications for office of sheriff.

This bill would change the qualifications for the office of sheriff, whereby no person may be eligible to hold the office of sheriff if they have been convicted of a crime of domestic violence or a misdemeanor related to gambling, liquor, or narcotics within five years. Under current law, only those who plead guilty to such crimes are rendered ineligible to run for such office.

Final Action, February 22, 103-14
Bill carried by: Representative John Whitmer
I voted “aye.”

HB 2524— Allowing petitions for a protection from abuse order to include a request for transfer of rights to a wireless telephone number.

This bill would create new law allowing individuals seeking a Protection from Abuse order to request the transfer of rights of a wireless telephone number.

Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Tom Cox
I voted “aye.”

HB 2530—Adding emergency medical services personnel to the list of mandatory reporters of abuse, neglect or exploitation of certain adults

The bill was introduced at the request of the Kansas EMS Association. An amendment by Representative Jennings removed Animal Control Officers from the list of mandatory reporters and required that reports of child abuse or neglect occurring in an institution operated by the Department of Corrections to be made to both the Attorney General and the DOC Secretary.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative John Resman
I voted “aye.”

HB 2549—Determinations of competency, commitment for treatment and state hospitals catchment areas

The bill provides clarification that defendants, regardless if they are charged with a felony or misdemeanor, could be committed to the state security hospital or any appropriate state, county, private institution or facility to be examined for competency.

Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Doug Blex
I voted “aye.”

HB 2567— Amending criminal code rules for determination of an offender’s criminal history classification.

This bill would amend the criminal code rules concerning an offender’s criminal history classification as contained in the presumptive sentencing guidelines grid.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Virgil Weigel
I voted “aye.”

HB 2568— Increasing loss thresholds for felony property crimes.

This bill would increase the legally defined value of loss for a misdemeanor crime of theft from $1,000 to $1,500.
Final Action, February 22, 96-21
Bill carried by: Representative Susan Humphries
I voted “aye.”

HB 2571— Regulating access to certain law enforcement audio and video recordings.

This bill would require a law enforcement agency to allow designated individuals to hear or view any audio or video recording made by a body or vehicle camera within twenty days of receiving a request for information. Such designated individuals include the subjects of the recording, a parent or legal guardian of a minor who is involved, a legal heir to those involved, or an attorney representing any of these individuals mentioned. This bill would not jeopardize any investigation due to the provisions of the bill.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Blaine Finch
I voted “aye.”

HB 2577— Emergency responders and creating the Kansas Right-to-Know Fee Fund

The bill requires fees collected by the Right-to-Know Program to be deposited into a newly created Right-to-Know Fee Fund. Previously these fees went into the SGF. This bill was requested by KDHE.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Doug Blex
I voted “aye.”

HB 2579— Providing compensation for a person who was wrongfully convicted and imprisoned.

This bill would allow an entitlement of $80,000 for each year of imprisonment should it be proven that an individual was wrongfully convicted and imprisoned. Moreover, $25,000 would be awarded to such individuals for each additional year served on parole or post-release supervision.
Final Action, February 22, 116-1
Bill carried by: Representative Blaine Finch
I voted “aye.”

HB 2580— Eliminating consumer reporting agencies’ authority to charge certain fees related to consumer report security freezes.

This bill would remove the fee for consumer reporting agencies to temporarily lift or remove a security freeze.

Final Action, February 22, 117-0
I voted “aye.”

HB 2581— Increasing the criminal penalties for the crime of giving a false alarm in certain circumstances

This bill was introduced by Representatives Whitmer, Markley, and Carmichael in response to swatting incidents. Via amendment, the bill was renamed the Andrew T. Finch Act, memorializing the Wichita man who was shot and killed by police responding to a swatting call.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative John Whitmer
I voted “aye.”

HB 2583— Relating to the control and eradication of noxious weeds in the state of Kansas.

This bill would amend statutory provisions relevant to the eradication of noxious weeds and would establish an advisory committee to recommend the designation and classification of noxious weeds in Kansas.
Final Action, February 22, 101-16
Bill carried by: Representative Kyle Hoffman
I voted “nay.”

HB 2599— Special Olympics Kansas license plate.

This bill would authorize the Department of Revenue to dispense Special Olympics license plates, Choose Life license plates, and City of Wichita license plates.
AMENDMENTS
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Trevor Jacobs
I voted “aye.”

HB 2602— Creating the legislative task force on dyslexia

The bill was introduced by Representatives Brim and Cox. The membership of the task force was amended from 17 to 19 members. Another amendment clarified who makes certain appointments of task force members. The task force will provide a report by December 1, 2018.
Final Action, February 22, 110-7
Bill carried by: Representative Brenda Dietrich
I voted “aye.”

HB 2603— Providing that the service of post-release supervision period shall not toll except as otherwise provided by law.

This bill would specify statute governing parole and postrelease supervision, whereby the service of postrelease supervision time shall not toll, except as provided in statute.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Susie Swanson
I voted “aye.”

HB 2619— Allowing any documentation required under the Kansas pesticide law to be created or maintained in electronic form.

This bill would allow any documentation required under the Kansas Pesticide Law to be created and maintained in electronic form. The signature of the individual who supervised the performance of a pest control service must be posted, as well as the names of individuals who performed such services.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Lonnie Clark
I voted “aye.”

HB 2639— Allowing KDHE to collect a fee for fingerprinting individuals maintaining or residing, working or regularly volunteering at a child care facility

The bill was requested by KDHE and is necessary to comply with new requirements for states found in the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014.
Final Action, February 22, 111-6
Bill carried by: Representative Patty Markley
I voted “aye.”

HB 2648— Including federal law enforcement officers in assault and battery against a law enforcement officer.

This bill would create a new offense of assault or battery against a federal law enforcement officer. Under current law, there is no state crime, other than simple battery or assault charges, for such crimes against federal law enforcement officers.

Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Blaine Finch
I voted “aye.”

HB 2691— Modifying notification requirements for the division of water resources regarding multi-year flex accounts and water right applications

The bill was requested by the Department of Agriculture and changes the deadline to file for a multi-year flex account from on or before October 1 to on or before December 1.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Steven Crum
I voted “aye.”

SB323— Concerning the Kansas retail electric suppliers act and the regulation of electric cooperatives and municipal energy agencies.

This bill would amend law related to Kansas Municipal Energy Agencies, the oversight of electric cooperatives by the Kansas Corporation Commission and retail electric suppliers.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Patty Markley
I voted “aye.”

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21
HB 2457— Enacting the asbestos trust claims transparency act.

This bill would enact the Asbestos Trust Claims Transparency Act, whereby plaintiffs filing a claim for an asbestos action would be required to provide statements and materials no later than thirty days prior to the date specified by the court to complete all fact discovery. The plaintiff would be required to conduct an investigation, file all asbestos trust claims that can be made, and provide a sworn statement indicating that such investigation has taken place.

Final Action, February 22, 77-40
Bill carried by: Representative Brad Ralph
I voted “aye.”

HB 2496— Enacting the nurse licensure compact.

This bill would allow Kansas to join the Nurse Licensure Compact, which would allow registered nurses and licensed practical nurses residing in Kansas to practice nursing in Kansas and other states that are a part of this specific compact.

Final Action, February 22, 116-1
Bill carried by: Representative Abraham Rafie
I voted “aye.”

HB 2549— Determinations of competency, commitment for treatment and state hospitals catchment areas.

This bill would clarify the competency of a defendant charged with a crime to stand trial. Specifically, if a defendant is charged with a felony, the court may omit them to a state hospital for examination, and only a state hospital. This bill would clarify that defendants, regardless if they are charged with a felony or misdemeanor or could be committed to a state hospital or any appropriate state, county, private institution or facility to be examined for competency.
Final Action, February 22, 117-0
Bill carried by: Representative Doug Blex
I voted “aye

Most Sincerely,

Representative Bill Sutton, 43rd District, KS